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Month: May 2019

Posted on by Arnon Erba in How-To Guides

If you have a recent business-class Dell PC with TPM version 1.2, you may be able to upgrade it to TPM version 2.0. Several Dell models are capable of switching between TPM version 1.2 and 2.0 provided a few conditions are met.

Prerequisites

First, your PC must support switching to TPM 2.0. Dell provides a partial list of TPM 2.0-capable models, while more models are listed in the “Compatible Systems” section of the instructions for the Dell TPM 2.0 Firmware Update Utility itself. If you can’t find your system in either of those lists, there’s a good chance it isn’t supported by this process.

Second, your PC should be configured in UEFI Boot Mode instead of Legacy Boot Mode. Switching boot modes generally requires a reinstallation of Windows, so it’s best to choose UEFI from the start.

Finally, while optional, it’s recommended that you update your BIOS to the latest version. You can get your serial number by running wmic bios get serialnumber from within PowerShell or Command Prompt. Then, you can provide this serial number to the Dell support website to find the latest drivers and downloads for your PC.

Once you’re ready, you can clear the TPM and run the firmware update utility. However, since Windows will automatically take ownership of a fresh TPM after a reboot by default, we have to take some additional steps to make sure the TPM stays deprovisioned throughout the upgrade process.

Step-By-Step Instructions

  1. First, launch a PowerShell window with administrative privileges. Then, run the following command to disable TPM auto-provisioning (we’ll turn it back on later):
    PS C:\> Disable-TpmAutoProvisioning 
  2. Next, reboot, and enter the BIOS settings. Navigate to “Security > TPM 1.2/2.0 Security”. If the TPM is turned off or disabled, enable it. Otherwise, click the “Clear” checkbox and select “Yes” to clear the TPM settings.
  3. Then, boot back to Windows, and download the TPM 2.0 Firmware Update Utility. Run the package, which will trigger a reboot similar to a BIOS update.
  4. When your PC boots back up, run the following command in another elevated PowerShell window:
    PS C:\> Enable-TpmAutoProvisioning 
  5. Reboot your PC again so that Windows can automatically provision the TPM. While you’re rebooting, you can take this opportunity to enter the BIOS and ensure that Secure Boot is enabled (Legacy Option ROMs under “General > Advanced Boot Options” must be disabled first).
  6. Finally, check tpm.msc or the Windows Security app to ensure that your TPM is active and provisioned.

References