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Month: July 2019

Posted on by Arnon Erba in News

If you saw a headline earlier this week about a critical security flaw in VLC media player, you may not have gotten the whole story. In fact, the issue is not nearly as serious as it originally seemed.

About a month ago, a user opened a bug report for a crash in VLC caused by a specifically crafted mp4 file. With the cause of the crash still undetermined, MITRE assigned the bug a CVE identifier and gave it a “critical” score of 9.8.

With the bug’s true cause and impact still undetermined, Germany’s CERT-Bund issued an alert of their own warning of a critical flaw in VLC. Worse, because the now several-week-old VLC bug report did not list any significant progress by the VideoLAN team, CERT-Bund announced that no patch was available. The alert kicked off a flurry of other news articles that culminated in a misguided warning from Gizmodo to completely uninstall VLC.

Not a VLC Bug

The only problem was that there was never anything wrong with VLC in the first place. The crash described in the bug report was the result of a vulnerability in libEBML, a third-party library that VLC depends on. However, according to a thread on Twitter from the VideoLAN team, a patched version of libEBML has been shipped with VLC for over a year. It appears the bug report was generated from a Linux system with an older, vulnerable version of libEBML installed.

With that in mind, the CVE score was lowered to “medium” and the report in the VLC bug tracker was closed. Ubuntu released an update for libEBML, and Gizmodo withdrew their doomsday-level announcement. In the end, no patch for VLC is currently required, though some Linux distributions may need to make an updated version of libEBML available.

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